The photo you upload must be geotagged, so we can place it on the map. Photos from newer location-enabled mobile phones are ideal.

About the RODAS Project

The Road Damage Assessment System Project (www.rodasproject.org) began in the summer of 2010 at Carnegie Mellon University with Ms. Veronica Acha, a graduate student at the Heinz School, Takeo Kanade, the U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor of CMU's Robotics Institute and Computer Science School and Robert Strauss, CMU/Heinz College Professor of Economics and Public Policy. They envisioned the use of cell phone technology and community involvement to create an independent and trusted repository of pothole pictures placed on an interactive map that would be viewable by anybody interested in seeing local road conditions.

The rationale and initial design may be viewed at:

http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/rs9f/RODAS_v7_8_15_2010.ppt

The purpose of the project is to encourage community involvement, through the use of advanced technology, in the identification, measurement and solution to public infrastructure problems. The current focus of the project is to enable the 3G and 4G cell phone photography and display of potholes in the city of Pittsburgh on the World Wide Web. An important design feature is the collection of such infrastructure data and its placement in a secure, independent third party environment so that it serves as a trusted electronic notary. Additional design features include the potential pictorial capture and use of the Rodas Project website for road conditions anywhere in the US.

The Rodas Project web application was completed in March 2011, being professionally developed by Todd Eichel, a recent graduate of Carnegie Mellon's Master of Information Systems program, and his engineering underlies its current implementation at www.rodasproject.org.

Initial seed funding in 2010 for the project was received from the Pennsylvania Business Council through its PBC Education Foundation ($2,000), and the Pennsylvania Boroughs Association through its Chrostwaite Institute ($1,500).

The RODAS Project team is now composed of Veronica Acha, Todd Eichel, Professor Kanade, Dr. Edward M Krokosky of the George Wilson Company, Pittsburgh, PA, and Professor Strauss.

The Spring, 2011 development goals for RODAS include:

  • ubiquitous collection and display of Pittsburgh's potholes (1,000 photos by April 2011)
  • development of a voice activated iPhone video capture application
  • porting to Android and other cell phone platforms

March 3, 2011